Monthly Archives: December 2014

Exceptional Sex

How does crystal meth participate in the continuing experience of HIV among gay men, and how have responses to HIV shaped gay men’s crystal meth use and surrounding practices?  The topic recurs with surprising regularity in gay community discourse:  We’ve had a number of excellent community forums on this issue in Australia in the last few months alone – and seen the production of some useful resources locally and internationally – yet some of the themes, findings and positions taken in these forums have persisted for a decade if not more.

Exceptional Sex was an attempt I made in 2007 to make sense of the evolving construction of “the Tina epidemic”, or whatever you’d like to call it – #WiredPlay, #Chemsex, #PNP, the “double epidemic”.  Each of these terms have tried to do the work of naming, in different geographical contexts, what nevertheless seem to be some common patterns and emerging forms in urban gay scenes internationally.

I’m sharing Exceptional Sex here because I think the analysis if offers remains topical, but the text itself is hard to access in electronic form.  (You can always buy the book  hint hint – Pleasure Consuming Medicine (Duke UP 2009), where the essay was later published).

But I’m also curious – what’s changed?  what’s stayed the same? what’s missing? where do we go from here?

What can we make of this issue?

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Filed under HIV behavioural surveillance, Masculinities, Online meeting sites, Parties, PNP culture, Policy and programs, Self-medication, Sexual practice, The statistical imagination

“Looking to parTy?”

Drug dogs, hook-up apps and transformations in gay partying practices

My analysis of the changed landscape of gay partying in Sydney has just been published in Contemporary Drug Problems (click here: Complex Events to access the article). The essay looks at the impact of current policing practices (the use of drug dogs)  on the shapes gay partying is taking: its forms, pleasures, risks, contexts and sociomaterial implications – especially in the context of the increasing use of digital hook-up apps for purposes of sexual sociability.  The paper also asks questions about what different methods/styles of drug research and criminological research do, and how drug practices defy the categories and practices employed in some of the more predominant research methods and modes of intervention.  (Skip the first paragraph if you’re less interested in theory than in practice. I just happen to think that theory is practice, and a practice that requires reworking every so often)

The article is now up on my academia.edu page too

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Filed under Affect, Drug dogs, Online meeting sites, Parties, PNP culture, Police, Policy and programs, Sexual practice